Press Release

Sennheiser

Sennheiser receives Engineering Emmy's® Philo T. Farnsworth Award

· Hollywood, CA – Audio specialist Sennheiser has been honored with the prestigious Philo T. Farnsworth Award at last night’s 65th Primetime Emmy® Engineering Awards in Hollywood. The Philo T. Farnsworth Award honors an agency, company or institution whose contributions over time have significantly impacted television technology and engineering. The award originated in 2003 as a means to recognize Panavision’s years of contribution to the film and television industries. Unlike most other Emmy awards, it is not awarded every year. The award is named after the inventor of electronic television, Philo Farnsworth.

Daniel, left, and Dr. Andreas Sennheiser, CEOs of Sennheiser electronic, at the 65th Primetime Emmy® Engineering Awards ceremony in Hollywood. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

Daniel, left, and Dr. Andreas Sennheiser, CEOs of Sennheiser electronic, at the 65th Primetime Emmy® Engineering Awards ceremony in Hollywood. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

Seven Engineering Emmys were awarded at the ceremony: the Philo T. Farnsworth Award, the Charles F. Jenkins Lifetime Achievement Award, Engineering Emmys for YouTube, Aspera’s FASP Transport Technology, Josh C. Kline for creating Digital Dailies®, iZotope RX Audio Repair Technology and Previzion Virtual Studio System (Lightcraft Technology), as well as two Engineering Plaques awarded to Lawo AG for their audio networking and routing system and Final Draft Screenwriting Software.

The Emmy name and the Emmy statuette are the trademarked property of The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

The Emmy name and the Emmy statuette are the trademarked property of The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

Daniel Sennheiser and Dr. Andreas Sennheiser accepted the Emmy statuette “on behalf of the passionate Sennheiser staff that helped to create innovative audio products and have provided impeccable customer service in the fields of TV and broadcasting.”

Frank Morrone, governor of the sound branch at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, himself an Emmy Award-winning Hollywood audio engineer, congratulated Sennheiser on the award: “I am excited that the Television Academy has chosen to recognize Sennheiser as a leader in developing products that have contributed to advancing the way television is created and produced.”

Daniel Sennheiser commented: “We are thrilled that the Engineering Awards Committee has selected Sennheiser for this much sought-after award. This is an incredible honor for all of us at Sennheiser, and I dare say especially for our teams in North America, who are reliable and enthusiastic partners to the benchmark-setting US TV industry. The award also honors the achievements of my father and grandfather, who firmly grounded and advanced the company in the fields of production and broadcasting.”

Daniel Sennheiser accepting the Philo T. Farnsworth Award, which honors the company's long-term contribution to television technology. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

Daniel Sennheiser accepting the Philo T. Farnsworth Award, which honors the company’s long-term contribution to television technology. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

Sennheiser’s wireless microphone systems and shotgun microphones are used in TV and film productions the world over. Whether robust and reliable RF wireless systems like Digital 9000 or highly precise gun microphones such as the industry-standard MKH 416 – sound engineers at production centers across the globe rely on Sennheiser microphone technology.

Daniel Sennheiser giving the acceptance speech. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

Daniel Sennheiser giving the acceptance speech. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

Sennheiser began producing shotgun microphones as early as the 1950s, and when the need for wireless transmission emerged in TV broadcasts at the end of that decade, the company was at hand to liberate hosts and actors from the cable with its first wireless mic in 1957. Since then, of course, technologies have evolved tremendously, resulting in today’s climate-resistant, rugged shotgun microphones and superior multi-channel wireless systems with tiny, easy-to-hide lavalier microphones and excellent handheld microphones.

Dr. Andreas Sennheiser making the acceptance speech. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

Dr. Andreas Sennheiser making the acceptance speech. Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences/AP Images

More Information:
Milestones of Sennheiser engineering Word doc, 66k
Recent Sennheiser applications Word doc, 66k

About the Primetime Emmy® Engineering Awards
The 65th Primetime Emmy Engineering Awards are overseen by chair Wendy Aylsworth, SVP of Technology, Warner Bros. Committee members are Stuart Bass, A.C.E., Picture Editors Governor, Academy of Television Arts & Sciences; Chris Cookson, President, Sony Pictures Technologies; Kevin Hamburger, Sr. Supervising Producer, THE TALK; Eileen Horta, Sound Editing Governor, Academy of Television Arts & Sciences; David Jensen, Partner, Monitor; Geoff Katz, Vice President, Watchwith; Frank Morrone, C.A.S., Sound Governor, Academy of Television Arts & Sciences; John D. O’Brien, Video Control/Consultant “The Big Bang Theory”; Mark Scott Spatny, VP Digital Effects, Stargate Studios; Barry Zegel, Senior Vice President and General Manager, CBS Television City.